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The Plight of Rural Hospitals (Part 1)

Even before the Covid-19 pandemic hit Iowa and the U.S., rural hospitals were confronted with their own pandemic of sorts – a financial crunch that could determine business survival. As we know, all rural communities rely on having viable access to a broad spectrum of essential health care services. Iowa is no exception.

Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs)

For decades, rural hospitals in the U.S. have experienced poor financials due to a number of reasons. One large reason is the gradual exodus of people leaving rural communities for urban areas, primarily for seeking more promising career opportunities. Over time, this migration resulted in an older, lower-income population remaining in rural communities, heavily relying on Medicare and Medicaid for their health coverage. On top of this, rising patient deductibles have contributed to the overall rise in bad hospital debt.

Unfortunately for rural providers, specifically hospitals, government reimbursement levels are often below the cost of providing these services. To help offset this revenue shortage, private payments through commercial insurance carriers and self-insured employers, largely due to cost-shifting, are considerably higher than government reimbursements.

To rescue rural hospitals from the ‘death spiral’ during the 1980s and early 1990s, Congress created the Critical Access Hospital (CAH) designation (Balanced Budget of 1997 – Public Law 105-33). The CAH designation was designed to reduce the financial vulnerability of rural hospitals and improve access to healthcare, thereby keeping essential services in our rural communities. CAHs receive certain benefits, such as cost-based reimbursement for Medicare services.

Over the years, additional legislation has been amended to the CAH designation and related program requirements. As of July 19, 2019, there were 1,350 CAHs located in the U.S. According to the American Hospital Association, there are 5,198 community hospitals. Iowa has 119 community hospitals, with 82 being CAHs.  A July 2020 map shows the locations of each Iowa CAH.

In 2019, the Iowa Hospital Association (IHA) developed a proposal to reform rural health care to help address the growing financial challenges of rural hospitals using a three-pronged approach. The outcome of this initiative is unknown at present.

Arrival of the Covid-19 Pandemic

Just before the pandemic arrived in mid-March, the Cedar Rapids Gazette published an article reporting that rural Iowa hospitals are at risk of closing. The article cites a 2019 national report by Navigant, a Chicago-based consulting company, that found nearly 18 percent of Iowa’s rural facilities (about 17 hospitals) “are at high risk of closing unless their financial situations improve.” Navigant also reported that 21 percent of all U.S. hospitals (430 total) are facing a similar fate.

When the pandemic tsunami arrived, the financial hit to hospitals, specifically small, rural hospitals, became even more acute. The primary reason – due mostly to the suspension of elective procedures in clinics and hospitals, including ambulatory surgeries, inpatient surgeries and inpatient discharges.

In June, the IHA reported that audit firm, CliftonLarsonAllen, through financial modeling, projected a potential ten-figure loss for hospitals statewide due to the pandemic, jeopardizing several rural hospitals. The modeling showed that 89 Iowa hospitals may lose more than $1.4 billion by the end of September, and possibly a worst-case scenario showing more than a $2 billion loss by the end of 2020.

A new analysis by Epic Health Research Network and the Kaiser Family Foundation found that, if recent pandemic trends continue through the 2020 calendar year, total hospital admissions will be down by at least 10.5 percent of predicted levels for the entire year. If this prognostication comes close to reality, loss of revenue will adversely impact many rural hospitals that were merely holding on during the pre-pandemic era. According to an October 16 article from Becker’s Hospital CFO Report, at least 47 U.S. hospitals have closed or entered into bankruptcy in 2020.

Kirk Norris, the CEO of IHA, commented that Iowa hospitals have received millions in federal support from stimulus bills, CARES act and Paycheck Protection Program, but not enough to cover predicted losses.

According to IowaWatch, 77 Iowa hospitals collected $928.3 million in accelerated and advance Medicare payments as a government stimulus to cover expenses in the Covid-19 pandemic’s early days last spring. These funds, however, allowed health care providers to receive, in advance, three months of anticipated Medicare billings that must be paid back to Medicare and Medicaid Services. This program was separate from the CARES Act and other Covid-19-related emergency plans – such as a 20 percent add-on payment by Medicare for inpatient hospital Covid-19 patients. All told, 77 Iowa hospitals applied and received accelerated Medicare payments, including 44 critical access hospitals, who could seek ahead-of-time up to 125% of their anticipated Medicare payments for a six-month period. CMS suspended the accelerated program on April 24 to re-evaluate the other revenue sources being made available to healthcare providers.

Nationally, stimulus efforts included $175 billion in two initial rounds of CARES Act funding, with another $10 billion for rural hospitals and other distributions based on high Covid-19 admissions, etc.

Public Health Plan Option Under Biden

Another storm that could potentially hit rural Iowa hospitals will first depend on the upcoming election results. Joe Biden and the Democrats are proposing to create a public option to compete with private insurance companies. This public option would allow individuals to purchase a public option plan from marketplaces in addition to allowing employees to elect a public option plan through their employers. This would mean the payment mix received by Iowa hospitals would further erode because more Iowans would now have health coverage that reimburses hospital care at a lower rate than private insurance.

The key question, however, is just how much different will the public option reimburse healthcare providers when compared to the current Medicare arrangement? If Biden is elected and the Democrats control Congress, this will be a critical piece to watch when the public option is debated.

The process of culling out the eventual mayhem of rural hospitals under a public option approach began last year. In August 2019, Navigant released an analysis finding that Iowa’s rural hospitals could lose more than $476 million dollars under a public option, putting dozens of rural hospitals at risk for closure. Using three different scenarios, the study suggests that between 25 and 52 of Iowa’s rural hospitals would be at high financial risk for closure due to a loss of revenue.

It must be noted, however, the Navigant study was funded by an industry coalition, Partnership For America’s Health Care Future, an alliance consisting of pharmaceutical, insurance and hospital lobbyists whose desire is to fight off the expansion of Medicare and any government-driven payment system. According to IHA CEO Norris, Medicare is a low payer in Iowa relative to other parts of the country. Again, the big unknown is the reimbursement level a public option would have if passed by Congress and signed by the President. The devil will be in the details.

Transparency in Hospital Financial Reporting

In the U.S., hospitals account for the largest expenditure of healthcare dollars, comprising about 33 cents of each dollar spent. It is imperative, therefore, that to effectively address rising healthcare costs and assure financial viability of all types of hospitals serving Iowa communities, state policymakers and the public will need appropriate financial information necessary to assess and understand the financial health of hospitals.

Each state has disparate reporting requirements for hospitals to report audited financial information – with some states being more comprehensive than others. In addition to the IHA providing some hospital data on their website, Iowa does ‘require’ hospitals and healthcare facilities to report a balance sheet detailing assets, liabilities, net worth, income and expenses and “other reports of the costs incurred in rendering services as the department (of Public Health) may prescribe.” This requirement comes from Iowa Code, Section 135.75.

But is this information adequate?

According to my contact at the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH), Iowa hospitals submit their yearly balance sheets and capital expenditures to the IDPH, but not every hospital participates, and the IDPH does “not have the time to track down the ones that do not (report).” This statute does not have a template for hospitals to use when reporting, nor is the information collated when received by IDPH. Hospital financial information is not shared outside IDPH unless it is requested. On an as-needed basis, the financial data is reviewed for “future projects that may trigger a Certificate of Need (process)” In short, “We do not have the staff to do much more with the information and have not had for many years.”

If the fate of each rural hospital is truly critical to our communities and state – and it is – how can Iowa and other states successfully address the needs of each hospital and the communities being served?

Next week’s post will discuss an interesting initiative that a national organization has designed to help state officials assess the financial viability and transparent practices of hospitals.

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New Kaiser Survey on Employer Health Coverage Released

National Study on Employer Health CoverageNearly every September for the past two decades, I have released our survey findings from the Iowa Employer Benefits Study and, during that same month, would eagerly await the results from the annual Kaiser Family Foundation Employer Health Benefits Survey. The Kaiser findings put a complementary national perspective to our Iowa results.

Unfortunately, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, I pumped the brakes on surveying Iowa employers for this year. Kaiser, however, did pursue their national survey and it was released a little later than usual – on October 8.  The results provide an important glimpse into what is happening to employer-sponsored health insurance around the U.S.  Overall, Kaiser surveyed 1,765 non-federal public and private organizations with three or more employees, and from this number, 540 employers were located in 12 Midwestern states (an average of 45 employers per state). The Kaiser study, I must mention, does not break out the results by each state, only by region.

Key Findings by Kaiser

The Kaiser survey is very helpful because it documents national health trends for employer-sponsored plans. Some of the key findings in 2020 include the following:

  • About 56 percent of employers offer health benefits, a percentage that remains unchanged over the past five years. Similar to Iowa, the larger the employer, the more likely health benefits are offered. About half (53 percent) of U.S. organizations with fewer than 50 employees offer health coverage, and nearly all (99 percent) of the organizations surveyed by Kaiser with at least 200 employees offer health coverage.
  • The average single and family premiums increased by four percent over the past year, while worker’s wages increased by 3.4 percent and inflation increased by 2.1 percent.
  • The average annual premium for single health coverage is now $7,470, while the average family health premium is at $21,342. Over the last five years, the family premium has increased over 22 percent, and over the last 10 years, it has increased 55 percent.
  • On average, covered workers contribute 17 percent of the total single coverage premium and 27 percent of the premium for family coverage. In our 2019 Iowa study, we found that covered workers contributed 18.6 percent for single coverage while workers for family coverage contributed 30 percent of the premium.
  • The average single deductible found by Kaiser now stands at $1,644, which is remarkably similar to last year’s $1,655 average. In 2020, 83 percent of covered workers have a deductible in their plan, similar to last year.
  • Most large organizations (81 percent) offer at least one type of wellness or health promotion program. However, among those that offer the coverages, only 11 percent) view the programs as “very effective” at reducing the organization’s health care costs.
  • About 83 percent of surveyed employers who offer health benefits say they are satisfied with the overall choice of providers available through their insurance plans, however, only two-thirds (67 percent) say the same about their mental health and substance abuse networks.

The 2020 Kaiser survey was conducted from January to July, with about half of the interviews conducted before the full extent of the pandemic had been felt by surveyed employers.  Kaiser President and CEO Drew Altman acknowledged, “…our survey shows the burden of health costs on workers remain high, though not getting dramatically worse. Things may look different moving forward as employers grapple with the economic and health upheaval sparked by the pandemic.”

Because of this, next year’s survey will provide a more realistic look at how the pandemic may have impacted employer-sponsored health benefits in the U.S.

To learn more about the Kaiser study, the article was published in the peer-reviewed journal Health Affairs.

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Cost-Shifting of Hospital Prices to Private Payers

Many of us are lulled into the rhetoric coming from hospitals and health systems that they must increase their prices for private payers because of inadequate reimbursements from public payers, such as Medicaid and Medicare. To some degree, this may well be the case. After all, hospitals and health systems need to generate enough revenue to offset costs to keep their doors open.

But this argument may not be as iron-clad as we were led to believe. Case in point: A recent report by the RAND Corporation about hospital prices paid by private health plans and how they compare with Medicare payments.

Findings of RAND Corp. Study

This is the third consecutive year that RAND Corp. has analyzed medical claims to determine how much private insurers pay for inpatient and outpatient hospital services. The most recent year of claims data analyzed was from 2018, which is about a two-year data lag.

Due to lack of medical price transparency, the sad commentary is that for private hospital prices to be discovered, hospital claims must be thoroughly analyzed to determine the ‘game of horseshoes’ on the prices being charged and paid by private health insurers and large self-funded employers who voluntarily share their claims data with RAND. In return, RAND then compares these prices to similar medical procedures that are paid to the same health providers by Medicare. With this information, private payers can attempt to negotiate better deals with the provider community.

This most recent report concluded that private insurers paid hospitals on average 247 percent of what Medicare would have paid for the same service in 2018. This gap is up from 230 percent in 2017 and 224 percent in 2016. To put this another way, if private payers from this study had paid hospitals at Medicare rates, they would have paid $19.7 billion less between 2016 to 2018 – a potential savings of 58 percent.

Here’s the Kicker

The RAND study’s lead author, Christopher Whaley, indicated that if hospitals are truly up-charging based on being shorted by Medicare and Medicaid, he would have expected to see hospitals with more Medicare/Medicaid patients charging private payers more, and those with fewer public patients charging less. But he found no correlation. His assessment is that “…sometimes hospitals charge high prices because they have the reputation or the quality or the market dominance to charge high prices…”.

All good reasons on why hospitals desire to keep prices opaque from private payers.

In addition to prices, the RAND Corp. also determined whether higher prices correlated with higher CMS star ratings and better safety scores from The Leapfrog Group. The findings show that high-quality hospitals with low and medium prices do exist, and it’s up to employers to implement tactics like narrow networks or reference pricing to steer employees to these high-value facilities.

Criticism by the American Hospital Association (AHA)

The AHA issued a Fact Sheet in January 2020, indicating that in 2018, Medicare paid hospitals 87 for every dollar that hospitals spent treating Medicare patients. For Medicaid patients, the AHA said that hospitals received 89 cents.

As frequently as the RAND Corp. releases studies on private hospital prices, the AHA equally releases statements refuting these findings.  AHA Executive Vice President Tom Nickels recently stated that the RAND report “again perpetuates erroneous suggestions that Medicare payments should be used as a benchmark for private insurers…”. Nickels also suggests that the claims analyzed represents a “handpicked sample of employers and insurers” that are minuscule compared to the entire hospital claims in the U.S.

Nickels does have a point, yet the AHA does little to nothing to equip private payers with information needed to determine whether or not the money being paid to hospitals are reasonable and demonstrate high value. But why would they? The AHA represents hospitals, desiring to perpetuate their members’ best interest at the expense of private payers who cover nearly 150 million Americans enrolled in employer plans or through individual market insurance.

Quite frankly, insurers are not immune from this problem either. They can avoid gag clauses that require secret prices and arrangements with hospitals and health systems. Employers, at a bare minimum, expect transparent behavior from their insurers and must insist that insurers eliminate backroom ‘deals’ with health providers.

The opaque pricing methods we have historically allowed must be relegated to the past. It’s time to open the doors and turn on the lights to expose the truth. Past pricing practices, convenient for some but detrimental for most, must be replaced with honorable and sensible pricing practices.

This is my take on the latest RAND report.

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