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By 2028, Iowa Employer Health Insurance Family Premiums Could Be…

As we enter the holiday season, I’m somewhat hesitant to share something that could spoil the holiday spirit – our projected health insurance premium 10 years from now. But to put a positive spin on this, especially as we prepare for Thanksgiving day, it is safe to assume the health insurance premiums that we are currently paying will be a ‘bargain’ compared to what we may be paying in 2028.

From our latest 2018 Iowa Employer Benefits Study©, we learned the average annual Iowa family health insurance premium is $17,448. Yes, this is a very inflated amount, especially when we compare it to 10 years earlier in 2008 ($11,520). Yet, this Iowa average is actually a bargain compared to the 2018 Kaiser Family Foundation national average of $19,616! Another positive spin for you!

The five-year average (2014 – 2018) increase for Iowa employer health insurance premiums is 7.7 percent. This figure represents all survey respondents, regardless of employee size and industry. It is important to acknowledge that this number represents the average increase BEFORE employers made adjustments to their health plans to keep the rate increase more manageable. Such adjustments typically include increasing deductibles, copayments and other plan features that require employees (and their dependents) to assume more of the medical costs when seeking healthcare through providers. Either way, the rate increases adversely affect employees’ the take-home pay.

The graph below calculates the average Iowa family premium rate trending forward for the next 10 years (compounded annually at 7.7%) and showing the annual employer and employee contributions (based on the Iowa employer contributing 68 percent of the total cost – another five-year average). One squeamish by-product of inflated health rates not shown on this graph are the plan design alterations that will surely be made by employers to shift costs to employees in order to keep the rates ‘manageable.’ One primary example of this cost-shifting is the family deductible, which was $1,963 in 2008 and is now at $3,900 in 2018 (99 percent increase over 10 years).

The family premium in 2028 could become $36,636! This amount is 110 percent more than today’s average family premium in Iowa.

Also worth noting, the trend line above the premium represents the estimated annual household income (HHI) in Iowa, compounded annually by 1.5% to 2028. The bubble above the $57,947 HHI for 2018 represents the percentage of family premium to HHI. This percentage is projected to almost double by 2028 if we cannot control healthcare costs. In short, over half of our household income (54 percent) could evaporate due to healthcare costs.

As we cast 10 years into the future, it is safe to give ‘thanks’ for what we are paying today in health insurance premiums. This is my best attempt to find some good in something that clearly is not.

Sorry to share this information.  Now, it’s time for the other turkey…

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

*DISCLAIMER:
I am NOT predicting that family premiums in Iowa will be $36k by 2028. Rather, based on past behaviors, employers will continue to find ways to alter their plan designs to keep their premiums lower than the initial increases they experience. Because of this, health plans will look considerably different in 10 years than they do today.

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Comments

  1. David:
    Interesting/sobering analysis. Isn’t the saying the past is a predictor of the future:( It would be interested to see a similar trend line on the expected cost of health care. Unless we can convince employers and their employees/families to play the game differently (different relationship with health care system and providers which in their eyes generally means less convenient) your numbers are not far fetched. An interesting communication challenge for those of us in this business. Thanks for your insights and Happy Thanksgiving.

    • David P. Lind says:

      Tom, you are correct…Einstein’s definition of ‘insanity’ applies quite nicely to this particular subject, doesn’t it! Happy Thanksgiving to you also!

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