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Iowa Employer Benefits Study© – An Annual Tradition to take a 1-year Sabbatical

All of us have established traditions in our lives, whether it be family or friend-related holiday plans, vacation travels to a favorite destination, attending or watching sporting events, and so on. Yet, due to circumstances beyond our control, such as time constraints, finances, death and adverse health problems, traditions are made to be altered, or possibly discontinued. After performing the annual Iowa Employer Benefits Study© for the past 18 years, I have decided to give the survey a ‘rest’ for one year. Believe me, this was not an easy decision. But after a great deal of personal and professional reflection, it is the right decision. My ‘tradition’ has now officially been altered.

In today’s world of perpetual political turmoil, healthcare – more specifically – health insurance, has become a political football. Hasty decisions are being made to benefit political promises, usually at the expense of pursuing sound policy practices. What has occurred in our nation’s capital in 2017 is akin to watching a surgeon perform knee surgery with a butter knife. The process has been extremely agonizing to witness and I find myself wincing as this grotesque process evolves.

Now more than ever, it is important to monitor employer-sponsored health insurance costs and components. After all, health insurance costs continue to outpace the Consumer Price Index (CPI) every year. Rising insurance costs have triggered a host of other health plan changes – forcing employers to offer the most competitive health insurance package that they can. I certainly don’t take this fact lightly.

But another fact is very important to me – the ‘value’ of care received. I firmly believe it should ALSO be on the radar screen for employers, their employees and the general public. Similar to how politician’s view our healthcare ‘system,’ employers appear to be mesmerized, rightfully so, by the insurance cost problems. Recently, Warren Buffett described medical costs as “the tapeworm of American economic competitiveness.”

This cost concern, however, tends to suck the necessary oxygen out of the room, crowding out badly-needed, laser-like attention and focus on key cost drivers that impact costs in the first place. This is ‘downstream’ thinking, the actions we take about fixing the symptoms of problems rather than concentrating on the issues that actually CAUSE the cost ‘pollution’ we find so objectionable. Being distracted with downstream symptoms has lulled us into believing that we simply need to fix the “insurance problem” and the ‘upstream’ pollution will miraculously go away. Inflated health costs are actually more harmful to us because we refuse to look beyond the insurance component to help address the cost conundrum.

This serves as the backdrop on why I decided to place the Iowa Employer Benefits Study© on a one-year sabbatical. It’s time to move ‘upstream‘ and disregard the naysayers who believe the status quo is much too difficult to confront. It is just too easy and expedient to continue the work downstream – making the appearance that something is being done to confront the cost issue. But if ‘optics’ matter, I’m in the wrong business.

In the next few weeks, I will reveal research I’ve wanted to conduct for the last number of years, but did not have the opportunity to pursue – until now. This work will be found under my companion organization, Heartland Health Research Institute. If you haven’t signed up to receive my HHRI posts, you may do so here.

Poet Robert Frost famously wrote, “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I – I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.”

This road may be lonely, but well worth the effort.

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