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Midterm Elections and Healthcare – The Consensus For Moving Forward Is…

The votes were cast and we now have a split in party control in both the House and Senate. What does this mean for healthcare as we now look toward the 2020 elections and beyond? Here are a few “bottom line” excerpts from various healthcare experts who follow the Washington political gridlock circus.

Drew Altman, President, Kaiser Family FoundationNovember 8 Blog

With a Democratic House, a Republican Senate, and President Trump in the White House, get ready for two years of maneuvering but little progress on health care – unless you look beyond Washington…Democratic control of the House stops any Republican efforts to revive their efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, block grant Medicaid or impose a per capita cap on federal Medicaid spending…the same applies to any big changes Republicans might want to make to Medicare…the proposals made in Congress and the campaign are important because they can shape the agenda after 2020. But for now, the states are where the real action is.”

Merrill Goozner, Editor Emeritus of Modern HealthcareNovember 8 Editorial

“…Given the powerful special interests invested in preserving the status quo, the most likely scenario over the next two years is inaction on each of those issues (addressing root causes of high healthcare costs, universal healthcare, surprise bills for out-of-network charges, etc.). This year’s election offered no guidance toward a politically acceptable solution to healthcare’s core problem: its unacceptably high cost.”

Stephen Miller, Online Manager/Editor, Compensation & Benefits, Society For Human Resource Management (SHRM) – November 8 Article

Mr. Miller summarizes many thoughts from national pundits about the next two years in healthcare – much of this relates to the employer perspective on regulation. Miller writes:

“The partisan divide makes it unlikely that any major changes in the ACA will advance to the desk of President Donald Trump. That doesn’t mean bipartisan efforts to address health care challenges are off the table. Meanwhile, heading into the 2020 presidential election, progressives will continue to advocate for government-funded single-payer health care for everyone.”

The Commonwealth FundNovember 7 Analysis

“…efforts to repeal the ACA or make large-scale changes to programs like Medicaid are likely off the table, though the (Trump) administration is expected to continue to pursue actions to undermine key elements of the ACA. What we may see is congressional activity on two fronts: stabilizing the individual health insurance markets and controlling high drug prices…”

Robert Pearl, M.D., Contributor to ForbesNovember 7 Blog

Dr. Pearl finishes with a paragraph that summarizes nicely the many blogs that I have written over the past seven years:

“Looking ahead, don’t expect your healthcare to change (or improve) much over the next two years. That’s because we have confused the disease with the symptom. Rising healthcare premiums and excessive out-of-pocket expenses are not the real problem. They are the result of wasted effort, inefficiency and price-jacking among healthcare’s biggest players: drug companies, hospitals and specialists. Health insurance coverage is essential, but until we as a nation grapple with how care delivery is structured, reimbursed, technologically enabled and led, voters will remain concerned about costs, fearful of losing their coverage and confused about how best to improve healthcare in the future.”

These are just a few post-election prognostications about healthcare’s uncertain road to reform. As we know from past observation, gridlock will continue and states will work diligently to find their own solutions to both access ‘quality healthcare’ and identify cost issues.

With a special thanks to Dr. Pearl (again) from his November 2 piece in the Los Angeles Times, the following quote is most appropriate for healthcare and how it usually fares in our national and local elections:

Campaign promises are like babies: easy to make, but hard to deliver.

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