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New Kaiser Survey on Employer Health Coverage Released

National Study on Employer Health CoverageNearly every September for the past two decades, I have released our survey findings from the Iowa Employer Benefits Study and, during that same month, would eagerly await the results from the annual Kaiser Family Foundation Employer Health Benefits Survey. The Kaiser findings put a complementary national perspective to our Iowa results.

Unfortunately, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, I pumped the brakes on surveying Iowa employers for this year. Kaiser, however, did pursue their national survey and it was released a little later than usual – on October 8.  The results provide an important glimpse into what is happening to employer-sponsored health insurance around the U.S.  Overall, Kaiser surveyed 1,765 non-federal public and private organizations with three or more employees, and from this number, 540 employers were located in 12 Midwestern states (an average of 45 employers per state). The Kaiser study, I must mention, does not break out the results by each state, only by region.

Key Findings by Kaiser

The Kaiser survey is very helpful because it documents national health trends for employer-sponsored plans. Some of the key findings in 2020 include the following:

  • About 56 percent of employers offer health benefits, a percentage that remains unchanged over the past five years. Similar to Iowa, the larger the employer, the more likely health benefits are offered. About half (53 percent) of U.S. organizations with fewer than 50 employees offer health coverage, and nearly all (99 percent) of the organizations surveyed by Kaiser with at least 200 employees offer health coverage.
  • The average single and family premiums increased by four percent over the past year, while worker’s wages increased by 3.4 percent and inflation increased by 2.1 percent.
  • The average annual premium for single health coverage is now $7,470, while the average family health premium is at $21,342. Over the last five years, the family premium has increased over 22 percent, and over the last 10 years, it has increased 55 percent.
  • On average, covered workers contribute 17 percent of the total single coverage premium and 27 percent of the premium for family coverage. In our 2019 Iowa study, we found that covered workers contributed 18.6 percent for single coverage while workers for family coverage contributed 30 percent of the premium.
  • The average single deductible found by Kaiser now stands at $1,644, which is remarkably similar to last year’s $1,655 average. In 2020, 83 percent of covered workers have a deductible in their plan, similar to last year.
  • Most large organizations (81 percent) offer at least one type of wellness or health promotion program. However, among those that offer the coverages, only 11 percent) view the programs as “very effective” at reducing the organization’s health care costs.
  • About 83 percent of surveyed employers who offer health benefits say they are satisfied with the overall choice of providers available through their insurance plans, however, only two-thirds (67 percent) say the same about their mental health and substance abuse networks.

The 2020 Kaiser survey was conducted from January to July, with about half of the interviews conducted before the full extent of the pandemic had been felt by surveyed employers.  Kaiser President and CEO Drew Altman acknowledged, “…our survey shows the burden of health costs on workers remain high, though not getting dramatically worse. Things may look different moving forward as employers grapple with the economic and health upheaval sparked by the pandemic.”

Because of this, next year’s survey will provide a more realistic look at how the pandemic may have impacted employer-sponsored health benefits in the U.S.

To learn more about the Kaiser study, the article was published in the peer-reviewed journal Health Affairs.

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