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‘Cabin Fever’ May Nudge Us to Suck at Something New

The COVID-19 pandemic poses many challenges, such as staying away from our work environment and being quarantined at home. For each of us, finding safe approaches to procure the necessities at the grocery store or the pharmacy can prove to be an uphill battle. Remotely navigating through job-related commitments also requires mental gymnastics. Unfortunately, others have been furloughed or no longer have jobs due to the limitation of travel and social distancing required for retail interactions. With these challenges, we search for ways to stay healthy – physically, emotionally, and hopefully, intellectually.

Given this short-term reality, I would like to share the following experience that has allowed me to cope with this new upside-down life. It can be challenging to stay both active and positive, especially while being indoors and practicing responsible social distancing.

Biking Outside – Prior to COVID-19

Early in the morning during the Spring, Summer and early Fall, I cycle between 22 to 30 miles each outing. Depending on the time the sun rises, my desire is to beat the traffic on the streets and impressive bike paths found in central Iowa.

For me, cycling in the morning is a sacred experience. This non-interrupted time allows me to plan out the day and hopefully solve problems – usually ‘marinating’ the facts that I know (or should know). Nature, it seems, serves as my inexpensive ‘office.’ Yes, cycling is a form of exercise, but really, it is about lubricating my mental well-being! My preference is to be on my own schedule. Because of this, I ride alone, pedaling as hard as I wish (or can!). I also must admit that I hate crowds!

But as we know, during the winter months, Iowa can be a challenging place to ride a bike. When it’s time to put away the bike, I will spend more time on the elliptical or walk outside. Running is no longer an option due to back issues.

Indoor Bike Trainers

This winter, two friends mentioned to me separately that I should consider purchasing a bike trainer that replaces my bike’s back wheel allowing me to bike indoors during the winter months. I did so in mid-January. And because of the COVID-19 challenges, I am so happy I did!

The equipment setup is actually quite simple:

  • Remove the rear wheel of the bike, attach the ‘smart’ bike trainer to the bike and chain.
  • Connect your bike trainer (via Bluetooth) to an indoor cycling software app which is loaded onto your preferred laptop, iPad or a smart TV. The software will simulate an assortment of road events around the world that a rider can choose while riding with local and international cyclists.
  • Put an appropriate table in front of your bike for your laptop, water bottle(s), etc.
  • Place a mat under the bike to catch your perspiration – the rides can be intense!
  • Have a fan to stay cool – it’s really a must!

One can choose to enter a ‘virtual’ race with others, or simply take a leisurely ride in New York’s Central Park or some other designated location around the world (found on the software app). The app that I use, Zwift, does a great job providing me with vital workout statistics, such as miles ridden, ride time, level of pedaling, and a host of other data.

The ‘Community’ Experience

With other ‘virtual’ riders before the beginning of a race.

Even though I am riding alone in my basement, I pedal with hundreds (and thousands) of other cycling enthusiasts who happen to be biking at the same time – regardless of where they live around the world. Riders can communicate with each other by using their phone app that allow for encouraging comments or by using a ‘thumbs up’ button on the app.  This sense of connection with others can be as much as you want it to be. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, one can still ride with others and yet maintain their social distance!

I share this experience because it does provide a sense of ‘community’ with others who desire to stay active and yearn to have some form of ‘safe’ interaction with the outside world. Since Americans and others around the world have been quarantined the past few weeks, the number of people biking on Zwift (and other apps) has significantly increased.

For me, this new exercise experience has been an excellent opportunity to release the tension that comes from the uncertainty of the stress and anxiety-filled COVID-19 environment. Truth be known, I’ve learned that my biking skills are not as accomplished as I once thought. There are many wickedly-good athletic individuals who can, through great endurance, pedal circles around this bike rider – regardless of age and gender! Put another way, virtual biking can potentially humble one’s self-perception of his/her cycling abilities.

During this period of virtual cycling, I have quickly learned that it’s ok to suck at something new…and actually feel good about it!

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Finally, working from home can have unintentional negative side effects, as I indicated in a 2018 blog.  To help combat some drawbacks, the Healthiest State Initiative has a nice site for those who wish to stay healthy and active while working from home.

Here’s to your continued health and safety!

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2020 Iowa Employer Benefits Study and COVID-19

Given the local and worldwide circumstances due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all taking things “day-by-day” for at least the foreseeable future – both personally and professionally. The ‘predictable’ lives we had just a few short weeks ago, no longer resemble what we have today.

Because of the unprecedented uncertainty for all businesses in this ‘new’ economic climate, we have found (while pursuing the 2020 survey) the response level of Iowa employers has dropped significantly compared to last year at this time. Frankly, ALL organizations are going through massive business and personnel upheavals that will require a ‘reboot’ of their workplace practices – and for some, perhaps ensuring mere survival. In light of this, because we have an annual goal of surveying 1,000 organizations, it will be very difficult to successfully ‘invite’ Iowa employers to participate in this year’s survey. My desire is to be mindful of the key issues facing employers and to refrain from our survey activity.

Due to this development, and with regret, I must suspend this year’s survey. At some undetermined time in the future, we will pursue a revised survey using newer, perhaps more pertinent questions, to gauge the benefit practices of Iowa employers.

I look forward to that time!

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While at home the past few weeks, I read the best-selling book by Erik Larson, “The Splendid and the Vile.” This book describes the one-year period – 1940 to 1941 – when Germany was incessantly bombing Great Britain, more specifically London. Despite not having the military support of the United States at that given time, the grit and courage that British Prime Minister Winston Churchill demonstrated would fundamentally decide the fate of his country, and frankly, the entire world.

During that difficult period of austerity, Churchill’s actions and words provided the necessary inspiration for his country citizens to persevere. Two of Churchill’s inspiring quotes are most poignant for me. No matter how difficult the circumstances are for us in today’s world, we have hope to overcome these obstacles.

“Victory at all costs. Victory in spite of all terror. Victory however long and hard the road may be. For without victory there is no survival.”

“It’s not enough that we do our best: sometimes we have to do what’s required.”

It is no wonder why Churchill is considered to be one of the most influential leaders of the 20th century.

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The Families First Coronavirus Response Act + A Churchillian Quote

Since my last blog on March 16, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, much has changed in the world, let alone Iowa. Listing the changes here would be futile, so I will not attempt to do so.

I will, however, share new federal legislation. The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) that was signed into law on March 18, provides paid emergency family leave in limited circumstances, in addition to paid sick leave for people affected by COVID-19.

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, the relatively quick overview of the FFCRA includes the following:

  • The emergency paid-leave provision applies to businesses with fewer than 500 employees. However, there are some exceptions available for small organizations that employ health care workers. These provisions take effect April 2 and are set to expire on December 31.
  • As for Paid Family Leave, the legislation updates the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) to provide employees with up to 12 weeks of job-protected leave when they cannot work – either onsite or remotely – because their minor son’s or daughter’s school or child care service is closed due to a public health emergency.
  • The first 10 days of leave can be unpaid. It appears, however, than an employee can opt to substitute accrued vacation, personal or sick leave during this time, but an employer may not require an employee to do so.
  • For the remaining 10 weeks, eligible employees must receive two-thirds of their regular rate of pay, which is capped at $200 a day – $10,000 total.
  • For Paid Sick Leave, many employers will have to provide up to 80 hours of paid sick-leave benefits if an employee:
    1. Has been ordered by the government to quarantine or isolate because of COVID-19.
    2. Has been advised by a healthcare provider to self-quarantine because of COVID-19.
    3. Has symptoms of COVID-19 and is seeking a medical diagnosis.
    4. Is caring for someone who is subject to a government quarantine or isolation order or has been advised by a healthcare provider to quarantine or self-isolate.
    5. Needs to care for a son or daughter whose school or child care service is closed due to COVID-19 precautions.
    6. Is experiencing substantially similar conditions as specified by the secretary of health and human services, in consultation with the secretaries of labor and treasury.
  • Paid Sick Leave must be paid at the employee’s regular rate-of-pay, or minimum wage, whichever is greater, for leaves taken for reasons 1-3 above.
  • Employees taking leave for reasons 4-6 may be compensated at two-thirds their regular pay rate, or minimum wage, whichever is greater.
  • Part-time employees are eligible to take the number of hours they would normally work during a two-week period.

It is important to note that employers cannot:

  • Require an employee to use other paid leave before using the paid sick time provided by this new legislation.
  • Require an employee to find a replacement to cover his or her scheduled work hours.
  • Retaliate against any employee who takes leave in accordance with the act.
  • Retaliate against an employee who files a complaint or participates in a proceeding related to the act – including a proceeding that seeks to enforce the act.

The Department of Labor issued guidance on this new law, which can be found here.

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Since our blog this past week, a handful of organizations responded to our invitation to share their workplace practices due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  A quick summary follows:

“As with others, CV-19 has wiped out a robust schedule of events and programs we had planned over the next 30 days. A small workplace of six employees, four were offered the option of working from home, with the other two “splitting time” in the office to cover business. Closed the office physically, but still working in it, and remotely. Our priorities in order are to: 1) Protect the staff’s well-being, 2) Protect our donor well-being (many being in the 65 and over category), and 3) Preserve the Foundation’s resources.” 

  • A healthcare & social services organization shared the following:
    1. We have carefully assessed which administrative employees are able to telework and still provide essential business function support. These employees were engaged in telework effective March 16 (2020).
    2. For those administrative employees who are not able to provide essential business function support from home, they continue to work in one of our administrative locations, practicing strict social distancing, hygiene, and workplace cleanliness guidelines.
    3. All administrative locations have been closed to unscheduled guests.
    4. All team meetings have either been cancelled, postponed, or moved to a virtual environment.
    5. All non-essential travel has been cancelled through April 30.
    6. Visitor restrictions at our service locations have been put in place.
    7. Daytime services have been closed per governor’s order.
    8. Active task force groups have been implemented for problem solving and strategic action moving forward with all information funneled for review by our Executive Leadership Team.
    9. Regularly updated inward-facing and outward-facing communications have been put in place.
  • A few other organizations mentioned similar protocols to those mentioned above.

Because organizations are now a week or two into the changes being made due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and measures taken have been shared through local and national media, we will discontinue our invitation to share the practices of Iowa organizations. Thank you to each organization that shared their practices with us!

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This past week, my Mom (age 88) emailed her numerous grandchildren sharing her experiences growing up during the Great Depression and the hardships that she and others encountered. She ended her message with the following:

“Now we are faced with another crisis. You/we have tasted a good life and now you/we are experiencing some of the difficult times that we (my generation) have experienced many years ago. This is what life is all about, and by working together like a family, we too, shall conquer!”

Mom, Winston Churchill could not have framed our ‘new world’ any better than you have.

To each of you, be safe during this unprecedented and challenging time.

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