Back Button
Menu Button

Reflections of a Privileged White Male

This title is redundant. I am privileged because I am white and male.

I usually write about healthcare, employee benefits and insurance issues, but given the racial unrest in our country, I feel compelled to write about a much more complicated and emotional topic.

The senseless killing of George Floyd, another black man while in police custody, has rightfully brought shock and outrage to our country. But with our history of racism, prejudice and social injustice, shock and outrage has never been enough to overcome the inequalities that consistently plague racial minorities.

It is time to be honest with myself, and I implore you to do the same. I am a white male who is protected by our status-quo society, given unwarranted power and prestige at the expense of others. This privilege buffers me from the naked truth of what is happening to non-white citizens. I don’t know what life would be like without having that privilege. Consequently, how can I possibly understand the perspectives and struggles experienced by those without privilege? I simply can’t.  But it is imperative that I begin to try harder.

In 1984, while unknowingly taking a wrong turn on a one-way street in downtown Minneapolis, I was stopped by a police car, sternly directed to step out of my vehicle and place my hands on top of the car. I quickly complied. The officer then forcefully kicked my feet apart and told me that I was driving the wrong way – the interaction felt unnecessarily aggressive.

Despite my privilege – power through wealth, health and opportunity that others are not afforded because of the color of their skin – this simple traffic stop made me feel demeaned. I was humiliated, frightened and incensed about how I was treated. But, unlike George Floyd and too many other people of color, my life was never at risk.

Watching George Floyd’s brazen killing changed everything for me – in a very fundamental way.

Upon reflection, that experience of feeling demeaned 36 years ago makes me realize that privilege is the ability to get angry and see that moment as an isolated incident. That experience lasted 10 minutes…not a lifetime. My societal privileges have shielded me from the reality that people of color are at risk of experiencing much worse every day. I have been complicit by not speaking up about such social injustices.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. described this complicity: “A man dies when he refuses to stand up for that which is right. A man dies when he refuses to stand up for justice. A man dies when he refuses to take a stand for that which is true.”

I have not stood up as I should have.

It is said that any society, any nation, is judged on the basis of how it treats its vulnerable members. Dignity should not be discretionary and should be afforded to all people.

So how can we as Americans move forward from this history of systemic racism? I don’t have the answer. However, I do know for real change to happen, it must begin with a confession from me, and from each white American who comfortably accepts the privileges enjoyed. Merely believing you are ‘not racist’ is not enough. We must learn how to be anti-racist in our core beliefs and practices.

I am responsible for educating myself and can no longer remain silent. I must not tolerate ignorant or intentionally harmful actions or words aimed at people of color. Listening and learning are the first steps in the very long and critically important journey ahead. Voting is a necessity – insisting on policy and political reform to eradicate social injustices. We, as a society, must step up.

I do not write this because I am more enlightened than others. But change must start with me – and each of us, individually.  I must recognize that my societal privileges have been at the expense of those who are without. I can certainly do better. Our country can do much better – and together, we must.

To stay abreast of employee benefits, we invite you to subscribe to our blog.

Comments

  1. Lynn Gallagher says

    Thank you for writing this and sharing your experience.

  2. Andrew N Williams says

    Great message today David. This needs to be said.

  3. Tom Press says

    Very well said.

  4. Kris Jensen says

    Very nice and timely piece.

Join the Conversation

*