Back Button
Menu Button

Rural Iowa Workers Outpace Urban Workers – But Not Favorably

I’m a sucker for playing with data, especially when it covers a relatively sizeable period of time. Over time, data usually tells a ‘story’ especially when drilling deeper. With the results of the latest 2019 Iowa Employer Benefits Study© now available, I tracked a few key cost comparisons as they relate to employees with single health coverage versus those with family coverage. More specifically, I found that Iowa workers employed by rural employers are paying higher healthcare costs – both in premiums and deductibles – compared to their urban counterparts.

Before concentrating on rural and urban data, I would like to share a few graphics comparing overall Iowa data from 2005 through 2019. This first graphic provides a comparison of how employee-only premiums have increased over 14 years of our study. Of note, this study was not performed in 2017.

Total Annual Spending – by Employee-Only Coverage

In 2005, the total annual premium for employee-only coverage was $3,708, of which the Iowa employer contributed $3,000 (or 81 percent of the total), and the employee pitched in $708 (19 percent of the total). In 2019, 15 years later, the total annual premium jumped by 89 percent to $7,020. The employer is now contributing $5,712 annually (up 90 percent), while the employee is chipping in $1,308 (up 174 percent).

Akin to the Ginsu knives commercial, there’s more. The deductibles purchased by Iowa employers increased from $750 in 2005 to $2,192 in 2019 – up 192 percent during that period. What is not covered on this graphic (please accept my apologies, Iowa-specific information is difficult to obtain) is the actual out-of-pocket money spent by Iowa employees for medical care each year.

Total Annual Spending – by Employee-Only Coverage

Total Annual Spending – by Family Coverage

Similar to the previous graphic on employee-only coverage, the family graphic that follows illustrates the continued ‘leakage’ from employee paychecks in the form of higher employee contributions and deductibles they are required to pay for covered services. However, in this graphic, I have included another layer of cost, thanks largely to Kaiser Family Foundation, that shows the national family out-of-pocket spending (based on employers with 1,000+ employees). Again, it would be very helpful to have Iowa-specific claims data, but I am forced to use national data as a replacement.

In 2005, the total annual premium for family coverage was $9,768, of which Iowa employers contributed $6,396 and the employee relinquished $3,372 through payroll deductions. In 2019, the total annual premium increased by almost $9,600 to $19,332 – an amount that would buy a 2019 Volkswagen Beetle. Additionally, family deductibles increased by 157 percent during that period, growing from $1,547 to $3,975.

Total Annual Spending – by Family Coverage

Employee-Only Coverage (Urban vs. Rural)

The next two graphics compare urban with rural employees, both employee-only and family coverages. Because studies from 2005 – 2011 did not breakout urban and rural data, the following graphics spans seven years (2012 – 2019).

In 2012, the total annual urban employee-only premium was $5,206, while the rural premium was $430 higher ($5,636). In 2019, the urban premium jumped by 29 percent to $6,723, while the rural premium increased by 32 percent to $7,413 – which is 10.3 percent higher than the average urban premium. Despite having a higher premium, the rural employee with single coverage has a higher deductible ($2,536) when compared to the average urban deductible ($1,888). Additionally, in 2019, the rural employee contributes $284 more annually for health coverage compared to urban employees.

Employee-Only Coverage (Urban vs. Rural)

Family Coverage (Urban vs. Rural)

Finally, the family premium for urban family employees jumped 60 percent from $11,980 in 2012 to $19,152 in 2019.  The rural family premium increased by 73 percent during this same period, and is now $402 higher than the average urban family premium. On average, rural employees contribute $812 more annually for health coverage compared to urban employees. As with employee-only deductibles, the average family deductible for rural employees ($4,370) is higher than the average urban deductible ($3,647).

Family Coverage (Urban vs. Rural)

In the final analysis, urban employees are more likely to pay less for their health coverage premiums, and when they seek medical care, will typically pay less out-of-pocket due to having lower deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums (not shown). This difference is also spelled out quite clearly when comparing the 2019 Lindex® scores between both groups – the urban employers scored a 78, while the rural employers scored four points less (74).

The Take-A-Way?

Without dispute, the cost of health insurance crowds out workers’ wages. The continuation of cost-shifting in healthcare deflates purchasing opportunities that workers and their families make elsewhere. On the surface, overall data found above can show trends happening for a particular population (see graphics one and two), yet when drilling down deeper with this same data, we find that other important – and disturbing –  issues are occurring (e.g. rural outcomes vs. urban outcomes).

Imagine what this data would show between selected industries, such as manufacturing vs. retail, or for-profit vs. non-profit. We did for 17 different Iowa sectors – it’s called the Lindex!

To stay abreast of employee benefits, we invite you to subscribe to our blog.

Comments

  1. Anne Kinzel says

    Awesome piece! The power is really in the data. This is such a powerful argument for big, structural change!

Join the Conversation

*