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DOL Releases FFCRA Regulations on April 1

On April 1, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued temporary regulations for the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), providing confirmation that employees must give notice to their employers of the need to take leave and provide documentation to support paid sick leave and emergency family and medical leave. This rule is effective from April 1, 2020, through December 31, 2020. Initial background discussion about FFCRA was found in our March 25 blog.

In addition, the Internal Revenue Service provides guidance on needed documentation for FFCRA.

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‘Cabin Fever’ May Nudge Us to Suck at Something New

The COVID-19 pandemic poses many challenges, such as staying away from our work environment and being quarantined at home. For each of us, finding safe approaches to procure the necessities at the grocery store or the pharmacy can prove to be an uphill battle. Remotely navigating through job-related commitments also requires mental gymnastics. Unfortunately, others have been furloughed or no longer have jobs due to the limitation of travel and social distancing required for retail interactions. With these challenges, we search for ways to stay healthy – physically, emotionally, and hopefully, intellectually.

Given this short-term reality, I would like to share the following experience that has allowed me to cope with this new upside-down life. It can be challenging to stay both active and positive, especially while being indoors and practicing responsible social distancing.

Biking Outside – Prior to COVID-19

Early in the morning during the Spring, Summer and early Fall, I cycle between 22 to 30 miles each outing. Depending on the time the sun rises, my desire is to beat the traffic on the streets and impressive bike paths found in central Iowa.

For me, cycling in the morning is a sacred experience. This non-interrupted time allows me to plan out the day and hopefully solve problems – usually ‘marinating’ the facts that I know (or should know). Nature, it seems, serves as my inexpensive ‘office.’ Yes, cycling is a form of exercise, but really, it is about lubricating my mental well-being! My preference is to be on my own schedule. Because of this, I ride alone, pedaling as hard as I wish (or can!). I also must admit that I hate crowds!

But as we know, during the winter months, Iowa can be a challenging place to ride a bike. When it’s time to put away the bike, I will spend more time on the elliptical or walk outside. Running is no longer an option due to back issues.

Indoor Bike Trainers

This winter, two friends mentioned to me separately that I should consider purchasing a bike trainer that replaces my bike’s back wheel allowing me to bike indoors during the winter months. I did so in mid-January. And because of the COVID-19 challenges, I am so happy I did!

The equipment setup is actually quite simple:

  • Remove the rear wheel of the bike, attach the ‘smart’ bike trainer to the bike and chain.
  • Connect your bike trainer (via Bluetooth) to an indoor cycling software app which is loaded onto your preferred laptop, iPad or a smart TV. The software will simulate an assortment of road events around the world that a rider can choose while riding with local and international cyclists.
  • Put an appropriate table in front of your bike for your laptop, water bottle(s), etc.
  • Place a mat under the bike to catch your perspiration – the rides can be intense!
  • Have a fan to stay cool – it’s really a must!

One can choose to enter a ‘virtual’ race with others, or simply take a leisurely ride in New York’s Central Park or some other designated location around the world (found on the software app). The app that I use, Zwift, does a great job providing me with vital workout statistics, such as miles ridden, ride time, level of pedaling, and a host of other data.

The ‘Community’ Experience

With other ‘virtual’ riders before the beginning of a race.

Even though I am riding alone in my basement, I pedal with hundreds (and thousands) of other cycling enthusiasts who happen to be biking at the same time – regardless of where they live around the world. Riders can communicate with each other by using their phone app that allow for encouraging comments or by using a ‘thumbs up’ button on the app.  This sense of connection with others can be as much as you want it to be. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, one can still ride with others and yet maintain their social distance!

I share this experience because it does provide a sense of ‘community’ with others who desire to stay active and yearn to have some form of ‘safe’ interaction with the outside world. Since Americans and others around the world have been quarantined the past few weeks, the number of people biking on Zwift (and other apps) has significantly increased.

For me, this new exercise experience has been an excellent opportunity to release the tension that comes from the uncertainty of the stress and anxiety-filled COVID-19 environment. Truth be known, I’ve learned that my biking skills are not as accomplished as I once thought. There are many wickedly-good athletic individuals who can, through great endurance, pedal circles around this bike rider – regardless of age and gender! Put another way, virtual biking can potentially humble one’s self-perception of his/her cycling abilities.

During this period of virtual cycling, I have quickly learned that it’s ok to suck at something new…and actually feel good about it!

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Finally, working from home can have unintentional negative side effects, as I indicated in a 2018 blog.  To help combat some drawbacks, the Healthiest State Initiative has a nice site for those who wish to stay healthy and active while working from home.

Here’s to your continued health and safety!

To stay abreast of employee benefits, we invite you to subscribe to our blog.

Employers and the Coronavirus Crisis

Given the escalating local and worldwide coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, we are now inviting Iowa organizations to complete an unscientific ‘survey’ on this website. We hope to learn more about what precautions and business practices employers are taking to avert potential disruptions to the workplace. One example is mandating that a certain classification of employees work remotely. From this information, I will then periodically share personnel practices that have been implemented by Iowa organizations.

In just one day, I’ve been contacted by two friends and an Iowa business on what employers are currently doing to help alleviate the growing concern about this ‘epidemic.’ Because the COVID-19 is both fresh and fluid in our local communities as well as worldwide – so many decisions are being made on the fly as to how to handle and protect employees within the workplace.

Examples of National Employers

How are some key employers locally and around the U.S. responding to COVID-19? Employers have an obligation to notify their employees (and customers) who may have been in contact with a sick employee. Employers should encourage sick employees to stay home – using paid time off benefits or perhaps short-term disability coverage. If no leave is available, the employer may also choose to pay employees – even when they are not sick. This is one way to avoid exposure to COVID-19.

Walmart, effective March 10, began an emergency leave policy after an associate tested positive for the illness. Walmart will allow employees to stay home if they are unable to work or feel “uncomfortable” at work. According to a memo seen by Bloomberg News, employees will need to use regular paid time off options. If their workplace is placed under quarantine, Walmart will pay employees for up to two weeks, and this absence will not count against attendance.

If a Walmart employee is affected by this virus, in addition to receiving two weeks of pay, the retailer will pay “additional pay replacement” beyond the two weeks (if needed), up to 26 weeks for both full-time and part-time hourly associates.

Paid leave and workplace practices are front and center now for employers, and critical for retailers and restaurants. Paid sick leave is much less common for lower-wage employees who work in the leisure and hospitality sector. These employees typically interact with the public, such as in the restaurant industy.

Organizations like Twitter Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Amazon have instructed thousands of employees to work from home, if possible. Whereas Costco Wholesale said that corporate employees cannot work remotely unless there is concern about employees being at high risk. If this should happen, the employee could use vacation or sick time to stay at home.

Wells Fargo, the third largest bank in the U.S., indicated that 62,000 of its 259,000 employees worked from home on Monday, March 9. One employee in San Francisco tested positive for the virus and Wells Fargo learned of this diagnosis two days earlier. Other financial institutions are also taking precautions.

Google, in order to mitigate the potential spread of COVID-19, has sent out a memo to employees across North America to work remotely. Just hours later, Google is extending this recommendation to include all workers in the United Kingdom, Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co. will have many of its 3,300 employees in Des Moines begin working from home, beginning on Monday, March 16. The goal is to have half of its employees working at home at any given time.

An insightful SHRM piece, written by Stephen Miller, regarding employer health, wellness and leave benefits and COVID-19 can be found here.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC has a webpage that provides resources for businesses and employers when preparing for COVID-19. It provides a good beginning to address interim guidance for employers, in addition to cleaning and disinfection recommendations. Employers are advised by the CDC to “ensure that your sick leave policies are flexible and consistent with public health guidance and that employees are aware of these policies.”

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) just sent out a document that contains useful information on measures to keep workplaces, schools, homes and commercial establishments safe.

Summary

Within the span of writing this particular piece, new emails and updates about COVID-19 are coming in with a flurry. One might expect this will be the new normal for a while.

We live in a world that requires vigilance both at home and at work. Despite this evolving environment, remaining calm and gathering as much trustworthy information as possible is the best solution to navigate through this ‘season’ of the unknown.

Again, completing our informal online survey will allow us to share various organizations’ business practices and policies.  As a reminder, our official 2020 survey will be covering many components of paid time off and paid parental leave benefits.

To stay abreast of employee benefits, we invite you to subscribe to our blog.