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Fast Food – Our Habit of Convenience

Habits we acquire happen over a period of time. They typically begin with a cue and a perceived positive reinforcement of a reward.

Maybe we bypass going to the fitness center or take a bike ride because it is more pleasant to sit on the couch and watch Netflix. It’s just too convenient to press the TV remote (cue) and then become engrossed in countless shows that are entertaining, educational – or both (reward). Doing this too often may develop into a new habit that could detract from a previous habit (e.g. gym or bike). We exchange one habit (exercising) for another, less-healthy habit (TV binge-watching).

According to a recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report, 36.6 percent of Americans eat some kind of fast food* each day, with men being a bit less discerning about what they eat (37.9 percent) than women (35.4 percent). When you think about it, fast food is always accessible throughout the day, making it just too convenient for many of us to pass up.

On a typical day, almost 23 percent of Americans will eat breakfast from a fast-food outlet, while about 44 percent of us will pick up a ‘quick’ meal during lunch. Not to be left out, fast-food dinners draw another 42 percent of Americans.

Ethnic group and age also provide differences when it comes to the daily consumption of fast food.

Ethnic Groups:

  • Black Americans – 42.4 percent
  • Whites – 37.8 percent
  • Latinos – 36.5 percent
  • Asian-Americans – 30.6 percent

Age Categories:

  • 20–39 years-old – 45 percent
  • 40-59 years-old – 38 percent
  • 60+ – 24 percent

Take-A-Way from This Report?

The conventional wisdom about fast food is that people eat it when they can’t afford something better (and healthier). However, this report suggests this wisdom is not necessarily true. For example:

  • Higher income equates to more fast food: The more money we have or make, the more likely we are to eat fast food on any given day. For example, about 32 percent of people who earn less than 130 percent of the federal poverty level eat fast food daily. However, over 36 percent of middle-income families (earn between 130 – 350 percent) purchase fast food daily, while 42 percent of people with incomes above 350 percent consume fast food daily.

This finding is interesting because healthier food can cost a bit more than fast food, and yet, regardless of having the ability to pay for more expensive, healthier food, we often elect the more convenient food that is available at our finger tips (often using the drive through). Additionally, with our younger population consuming more fast food compared to older generations, younger families (and their children) will be more likely to establish unhealthy eating habits – creating health issues later in life (obesity, heart disease, dementia, etc.). The intake of calories, fat, and sodium eventually adversely affects our health in many different ways.

Iowa Youth Obesity Rate is High

Another report recently released by The National Survey of Children’s Health compares the obesity rates of children (ages 10 to 17) for all 50 states. Almost 18 percent of our youth in Iowa are obese, ranking our state as the 10th highest state for youth obesity. Iowa’s white (non-Hispanic) youth are significantly higher than the national rate.

The implications of having overweight and/or obese youth present future challenges to our state. For one, employers desire to have healthy and productive employees in their workplaces, and having unhealthy employees will continue to leverage up their health insurance costs due to higher healthcare usage. No one wants a poor quality of life, but often this is a result of the choices and habits that have been established much earlier in our lives.

Per a recent Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health report, we are still trying to come to terms with the dietary fat we consume – fat that is good and fat that is bad.

This much we know. Establishing a habit based on mere convenience may not be the smart choice we should make for ourselves, individually – or as a society.

Now, where did I put my channel changer…

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*NOTE: For this survey, fast food was broadly defined as any item obtained from a “fast food/pizza” establishment. It is possible that some people may interpret fast food differently from one another – e.g. takeout sushi, etc.

Was Grandma Ahead of Her Time?

It’s early Friday morning, a day that marks the beginning of a long holiday weekend, which will culminate on Monday – Christmas Day. In my office, I’ve just poured my third cup of java and started perusing newly-arrived emails from last night and this morning. One particular email caught my eye and I naturally opened it to learn more.

The content was about…coffee.

Grandma and Coffee

The aroma and taste of coffee, at least for me, became an acquired and ‘necessary’ habit over the years, beginning while I was in college. Late night cramming required that I not doze during the precious remaining critical hours prior to the exams. Caffeinated coffee became my best late-night friend.

The origin of my eventual coffee ‘addiction’ can be traced back to my grandparent’s farm – an acreage north of Detroit Lakes, MN. During the summer months in the late 1960s, my siblings and I would have the opportunity to spend time at the farm helping with chores and experience rural living – working in the garden, hitching a ride on a tractor, playing by the slough, and enjoying some of the best home-grown beef and vegetables at dinner. Without a doubt, the time spent on the farm provided some of my best childhood memories!

To begin their day, I noticed that my grandparents enjoyed a hot beverage that was prepared on their wood-burning stove. While percolating, the aroma of the black brew seemed somewhat odd to me, but my grandparents relished the benefits coffee provided to them when beginning their day. As an impressionable boy, I remember asking Grandma if I could have a sip of this ‘black magic,’ and she, very prudently, complied. I remember her telling me, “Someday, you may like the taste of this, David!” The taste, I quickly learned, was not what I had expected, and that was my first and last sip of coffee – until my college days.

Recent Findings about Coffee

The email I received about coffee came from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. According to a study recently published by Harvard, people with colorectal cancer (CRC) who drank at least four cups of coffee per day after their diagnosis had a ‘significantly lower’ risk of early death – either from this cancer or any cause – than those who didn’t drink coffee. According to the American Cancer Society, CRC is the second-leading cause of cancer in the U.S.

Just four days earlier, I had successfully completed my fourth colonoscopy since 2003. Needless to say, I instinctively poured myself another cup of java and continued reading.

Previous evidence suggested that coffee may help lower the risk of mortality, in addition to several chronic diseases, possibly due to its ability to fight inflammation and insulin resistance. Coffee contains anti-carcinogenic compounds that can benefit us in other ways. Although this newest finding cannot claim causality between drinking coffee and reduced mortality risk, the findings are nevertheless encouraging and are worth further exploration.

My grandparents have long since passed away, but what they shared with their grandson some 50 years ago continues to add to the priceless memories I have of them today. Without realizing it, perhaps grandma was ahead of her time regarding coffee’s taste and health benefits!

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