Back Button
Menu Button

Another One Bites the Dust – Haven Ends Healthcare Quest

The medical industrial complex has claimed yet another innocent victim. But this is not just any victim.

Three years ago, an independent company, Haven Health, was formed by three powerhouse forces in the business world: Amazon, JPMorgan Chase and Berkshire Hathaway. Meant to transform healthcare, Haven was a very unique collaboration that put the healthcare industry on notice that a new sheriff would be in town to help clean up a messy and unruly industry dominated by legacy players.

The likes of Jeff Bezos (Amazon), Jamie Dimon (JPMorgan Chase) and Warren Buffett (Berkshire Hathaway) were serving as the newly-assembled sheriff that would instill both fear and respect by industry inhabitants.  When this marriage was announced in 2018, I wrote a blog about the likelihood of having three disruptive ‘outsiders’ force long overdue changes to healthcare practices. I ended this blog with one stark sentence: “Only time will tell.”

Time is Now Here

It appears the healthcare industry is more complex (and unforgiving) than even the sheriff had believed. This most recent development reminds me of what President Trump naively claimed while attempting to repeal and replace Obamacare in 2017: “Nobody knew that healthcare could be so complicated…”

On Monday of this week, Haven announced that it will end its mission of exploring healthcare solutions, such as “piloting new ways to make primary care easier to access, insurance benefits simpler to understand and easier to use, and prescription drugs more affordable.” According to the Wall Street Journal (subscription required), any collaboration between these companies will become less formal in the future.

In addition to impacting their own respective workforces, the collaboration also intended to influence and disrupt the payment and delivery models currently in place. Reading between the lines, however, when their appointed chief executive, Dr. Atul Gawande, stepped down from his role in May of 2020, perhaps the proverbial ‘flywheel’ lost any inertia it may have gained.

Lesson Learned

Going forward, it will take more than three highly-respected leaders and their innovative organizations to mildly disrupt a system that desperately needs disruption, but has largely resisted meaningful changes. Many have tried to reform this massive industry, but up to this point, there has been very limited success.

In healthcare, bold changes may only come after America experiences an unimaginable crisis beyond anything we’ve ever encountered before.  But then again, only time will tell.

–Update on Hospital Price Transparency Requirement

My Tuesday blog on the new hospital price transparency mandate revealed that two major Des Moines hospitals have not posted the required pricing information despite a national mandate to do so – beginning January 1. The penalty for noncompliance is, quite frankly, small potatoes for at least larger hospitals – just $300 a day. To learn more, the CMS issued a FAQ on December 23.

According to POLITICO Pulse just one-third of the top 20 hospitals have posted visible price lists as of New Year’s Day. Politico reports, of those hospitals that have posted, the information is often vague or hard-to-decifer. More to come in future blogs on this subject.

To stay abreast of employee benefits, we invite you to subscribe to our blog.