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My Office in a Treehouse? Pandemic Reflections

Over the years, I have had the luxury of working from home when inclement weather or other circumstances dictated that I do so. Other than making sure that I had my laptop and a reliable internet connection, I was good to go.

This past February, my wife had her knee replaced, requiring us to make necessary changes within the living space at home to ensure a safe and convenient recovery. During this period, I worked remotely without any hiccups. A few days a week, I would stop by the office – just 12 minutes away from home – to pick up the mail and water a few plants.

On March 11, the World Health Organization declared the relatively little-known coronavirus outbreak to be a worldwide pandemic. Two days later, President Trump declared the pandemic a national emergency. Within days, our state and country ground to a halt, profoundly altering our personal and professional lives. ‘Social distancing’ became the new norm. Businesses shut down and our once-busy streets resembled something out of an old western movie, minus the tumbleweeds.

We all painfully know the story since March: Millions of Americans lost their jobs or were furloughed. Those employees fortunate to continue working were relegated to finding new ways to operate out of their homes. For many of us, working remotely continues to this day – and will likely continue into the foreseeable future.

During the last seven months, I have had ample time to reflect on whether or not working in an office – along with its’ associated costs – made economic sense. Much of the work I do revolves around research and analysis – some is outsourced to trusted partners. In short, my work requires a quiet workspace with internet access, a coffee maker and a phone for periodic conversations. Being tethered to a formal office space is optional.

Over time, I have found that phone calls were becoming about as frequent as using the fax (remember that relic?).  Prior to the pandemic, most in-person meetings were conducted over coffee or lunch. It really was that simple.

After weighing the pros and cons, the necessity of having a separate office suite became a very easy decision. Paying office rent and utilities, phone and internet, renter’s insurance and, to a minor extent, fuel to commute to and from the office, was a personal preference – but not a business necessity. All of this can be accomplished from home – or perhaps a slightly advanced treehouse.

In the not too distant past, I may have confused my work-based livelihood with where I worked rather than what I did at work. For me, I have sorted out this seemingly razor-thin difference and have reconciled what is most desirable. I can easily perform this same work in the confines of my home and not skip a beat on my output. The pandemic has proven to be a helpful audition, guiding me to feel more comfortable with this eventual change of converting to a full-time remote workplace.

I recently spoke with a local commercial realtor who told me that office space may become more plentiful because of the pandemic. This glut of office space, however, has not hit the commercial market quite yet, primarily due to the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) helping offset payroll costs, rent, interest and utilities for small businesses. But with a prolonged pandemic, decisions similar to mine will likely follow. A Des Moines Register article on September 3 approached this topic, using some interesting national statistics.

My office conversion has already begun, and in about eight months when my lease expires, I will be sitting in my home den, lakeside or in other locations – performing the ‘what’ regardless of ‘where.’ I’m very comfortable knowing that making ‘sausage’ in the backroom will be no different from home versus an office suite some 12 minutes away. The treehouse idea, however, may need to wait.

Working remotely will be seamless, while wearing pajamas has yet to be decided!

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