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The Families First Coronavirus Response Act + A Churchillian Quote

Since my last blog on March 16, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, much has changed in the world, let alone Iowa. Listing the changes here would be futile, so I will not attempt to do so.

I will, however, share new federal legislation. The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) that was signed into law on March 18, provides paid emergency family leave in limited circumstances, in addition to paid sick leave for people affected by COVID-19.

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, the relatively quick overview of the FFCRA includes the following:

  • The emergency paid-leave provision applies to businesses with fewer than 500 employees. However, there are some exceptions available for small organizations that employ health care workers. These provisions take effect April 2 and are set to expire on December 31.
  • As for Paid Family Leave, the legislation updates the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) to provide employees with up to 12 weeks of job-protected leave when they cannot work – either onsite or remotely – because their minor son’s or daughter’s school or child care service is closed due to a public health emergency.
  • The first 10 days of leave can be unpaid. It appears, however, than an employee can opt to substitute accrued vacation, personal or sick leave during this time, but an employer may not require an employee to do so.
  • For the remaining 10 weeks, eligible employees must receive two-thirds of their regular rate of pay, which is capped at $200 a day – $10,000 total.
  • For Paid Sick Leave, many employers will have to provide up to 80 hours of paid sick-leave benefits if an employee:
    1. Has been ordered by the government to quarantine or isolate because of COVID-19.
    2. Has been advised by a healthcare provider to self-quarantine because of COVID-19.
    3. Has symptoms of COVID-19 and is seeking a medical diagnosis.
    4. Is caring for someone who is subject to a government quarantine or isolation order or has been advised by a healthcare provider to quarantine or self-isolate.
    5. Needs to care for a son or daughter whose school or child care service is closed due to COVID-19 precautions.
    6. Is experiencing substantially similar conditions as specified by the secretary of health and human services, in consultation with the secretaries of labor and treasury.
  • Paid Sick Leave must be paid at the employee’s regular rate-of-pay, or minimum wage, whichever is greater, for leaves taken for reasons 1-3 above.
  • Employees taking leave for reasons 4-6 may be compensated at two-thirds their regular pay rate, or minimum wage, whichever is greater.
  • Part-time employees are eligible to take the number of hours they would normally work during a two-week period.

It is important to note that employers cannot:

  • Require an employee to use other paid leave before using the paid sick time provided by this new legislation.
  • Require an employee to find a replacement to cover his or her scheduled work hours.
  • Retaliate against any employee who takes leave in accordance with the act.
  • Retaliate against an employee who files a complaint or participates in a proceeding related to the act – including a proceeding that seeks to enforce the act.

The Department of Labor issued guidance on this new law, which can be found here.

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Since our blog this past week, a handful of organizations responded to our invitation to share their workplace practices due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  A quick summary follows:

“As with others, CV-19 has wiped out a robust schedule of events and programs we had planned over the next 30 days. A small workplace of six employees, four were offered the option of working from home, with the other two “splitting time” in the office to cover business. Closed the office physically, but still working in it, and remotely. Our priorities in order are to: 1) Protect the staff’s well-being, 2) Protect our donor well-being (many being in the 65 and over category), and 3) Preserve the Foundation’s resources.” 

  • A healthcare & social services organization shared the following:
    1. We have carefully assessed which administrative employees are able to telework and still provide essential business function support. These employees were engaged in telework effective March 16 (2020).
    2. For those administrative employees who are not able to provide essential business function support from home, they continue to work in one of our administrative locations, practicing strict social distancing, hygiene, and workplace cleanliness guidelines.
    3. All administrative locations have been closed to unscheduled guests.
    4. All team meetings have either been cancelled, postponed, or moved to a virtual environment.
    5. All non-essential travel has been cancelled through April 30.
    6. Visitor restrictions at our service locations have been put in place.
    7. Daytime services have been closed per governor’s order.
    8. Active task force groups have been implemented for problem solving and strategic action moving forward with all information funneled for review by our Executive Leadership Team.
    9. Regularly updated inward-facing and outward-facing communications have been put in place.
  • A few other organizations mentioned similar protocols to those mentioned above.

Because organizations are now a week or two into the changes being made due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and measures taken have been shared through local and national media, we will discontinue our invitation to share the practices of Iowa organizations. Thank you to each organization that shared their practices with us!

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This past week, my Mom (age 88) emailed her numerous grandchildren sharing her experiences growing up during the Great Depression and the hardships that she and others encountered. She ended her message with the following:

“Now we are faced with another crisis. You/we have tasted a good life and now you/we are experiencing some of the difficult times that we (my generation) have experienced many years ago. This is what life is all about, and by working together like a family, we too, shall conquer!”

Mom, Winston Churchill could not have framed our ‘new world’ any better than you have.

To each of you, be safe during this unprecedented and challenging time.

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