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The Medical Error Problem – Do Employers Have Solutions?

Medical errors do not discriminate. In fact, preventable medical errors occur on an ‘equal-opportunity’ basis to patients, regardless of age, gender, race, political ideology and the type of medical plan you may (or may not) have. This means that employer-sponsored health plans are not exempt from medical mishaps and the associated costs that come with this problem.

Although the cost to employers can be massive – it is opaque and mostly hidden. Leah Binder, president of The Leapfrog Group, a national nonprofit organization whose mission is to address the quality, safety and affordability of American healthcare, has stated the cost associated with this unintended harm that silently creeps into the premiums that employers and employees pay – is a “hidden surcharge.”

This ‘surcharge’ not only includes additional costs to fix the medical problem resulting from the error, but the lost productivity of absenteeism and presenteeism – when employees lose time away from work and the emotional toll it takes when they do show up for work.

Simply put, employers own this problem, whether they know it or not. Relying on your insurance company or vendor to apply leverage on healthcare providers is most likely a delusional strategy in trying to improve this problem.

A 2013 Leapfrog Group white paper calculates that hospitals with a grade of “A” on their Hospital Safety Grade (hospitals who participate in Leapfrog surveys that rate patient safety efforts), will have a hidden surcharge for medical errors of $6,962, while a hospital with a grade of “C” or lower will command a hidden surcharge of $958 higher ($7,920 total). It is quite evident, especially when it comes to safety of medical care, not all hospitals are created equal. This is a fact that both patients and payers alike must acknowledge – and address.

Recently, Leapfrog announced that five states showed the most improvement over the five-year period since the Hospital Safety Grade’s inception. The states are Oregon, Rhode Island, Hawaii, Wisconsin and Idaho. Just as politics is considered to be local, so too is the healthcare that is delivered to patients. Though patient safety is a national problem, the solutions must begin locally, within each of our communities and within state borders. See how Iowa ranks in the most recent Leapfrog rankings.

With this in mind, what can Iowa employers do about patient safety issues? Actually, quite a bit.

What can Iowa Employers do about Patient Safety Issues?

Heartland Health Research Institute recently wrote a fact sheet, “What Employers Can Do About Medical Errors,” that addresses at least six approaches Iowa employers can consider taking to reduce the incidence of medical errors. The approaches include:

  1. Make insurance contracting decision-making process part of the medical error strategy.
  2. Develop a coalition with other like-minded employers and purchasers in your community.
  3. Meet with local hospital(s) and clinic(s) to convey the importance of safety and quality – require they demonstrate ‘cultures of safety’ within their respective organizations.
  4. Actively communicate the importance of safety issues to employees.
  5. Encourage employees to report medical errors when they occur.
  6. Visit with both state and federally-elected officials, trade association groups in which your organization participates, and other local commerce organizations.

It is tough sledding to make policy recommendations that would have a chance of becoming law. Instead, to disrupt healthcare into being delivered more safely, it really must begin with those who actually pay the healthcare bills – the employers and their employees, and yes, the taxpayers who ultimately fund Medicare and Medicaid and other state healthcare programs. In the past, this applied-pressure usually started (and ended) with only the largest of employers. But for this new movement to gain local traction, employers of all sizes and industries must embrace the approach that there is zero-tolerance for preventable medical errors.

Just remember, when we don’t demand safety in our healthcare, they don’t supply it. There’s no better time than now to begin taking action.

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