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Three Key Health Plan Comparisons Between Iowa and U.S.

Three important health plan components that are first and foremost on the minds of employers when assessing their annual plan offerings, include: health premiums, employee health coverage contribution and deductibles employees are required to pay. It is natural, therefore, to compare Iowa averages to national norms, thanks largely to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s Employer Health Benefits Survey, which was just released on September 25. Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) is a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco, CA.

Brief Survey Background

Since the year 1999, the KFF has been performing their national survey of employer health plans, the same year that we began our Iowa Employer Benefits Study©. For the record, there was no particular reason that 1999 was the base year used by KFF and our organization, but speaking for myself, I’m happy that we can use the annual KFF study as a measuring stick to our statewide annual results.

Before I share the graphic comparisons, I must comment that surveys can vary from one another using slightly different methodologies, and there is no exception with the two studies being compared in this blog. The largest difference is that KFF is a national survey, which in 2019, randomly-selected 2,012 non-federal public and private organizations with three or more employees. Additionally, KFF asked another 2,383 organizations a single question about offering health coverage.

The Iowa Employer Benefits Study© is a statewide-only survey. Each year, we seek to have at least 1,000 organizations participate.  These organizations are randomly-selected to ensure that results will reflect the overall population of organizations within Iowa. Although we survey employers with at least two employees, we do not actively randomly-select organizations with 2 to 10 employees. During the survey process, however, if respondents fall into this size category due to downsizing, we will include their data within our report.

It is important to note that Iowa organizations can also be surveyed by KFF, but the number is considerably fewer than our goal of 1,000 organizations. In 2019, for example, KFF surveyed 612 organizations in 12 midwestern states, including Iowa, which averages out to 51 organizations for each state. This Midwest average is consistent with prior KFF surveys.

Health Plan Premiums

Since we released our study in early August, we learned that Iowa employer-sponsored health premiums increased by 7.1 percent during the past year, which is slightly higher than the KFF national average increase of 3.4 percent for single and 5 percent for family coverages. One explanation for this variance between surveys can be that KFF may have compared the actual premium change from 2018 to 2019 – AFTER plan design changes were made. Our survey, however, asked Iowa employers to share their rate adjustments (e.g. increase, decrease, no change) during the past year BEFORE plan design changes were made – subtle difference, but important.

The annual KFF single premium in 2019 is $7,188, which is merely $171 higher than the average Iowa single premium of $7,017. Statistically speaking, the single premiums are in a dead heat with each other. As for family premiums, the KFF premium is now at $20,576, which is $1,241 higher (or 6.4 percent) than Iowa’s $19,335. We often hear that Iowa’s medical costs are lower than the national averages, which is a true statement. However, it does appear with the latest data available, Iowa is inching closer to the national premium averages.

Since 1999, health premiums from both studies show very similar results when it comes to growth. Below is a graphic that superimposes the KFF premiums to the annual Iowa history of single and family premiums. The premium increases are staggering for both, but equally horrific is that the Iowa premiums (both single and family) have increased slightly higher compared to the national norms (denoted in green font).Employee Contribution as a Percentage of Premium

As the health premiums change each year, usually through increases, employers are forced to make decisions on how much to shift this increased cost to employees, most often through health plan design changes and having the employee assume more of the premium burden. One way to measure just how much the employer wishes the employee to assume is illustrated in the graphic below.

From this graphic, Iowa organizations and their national counterparts are nearly identical as to the percentage of the total premium that is assumed by employees for both single and family coverages. For single coverage, Iowa employees pay 19 percent of the total single premium, while employees elsewhere contribute 18 percent of the single cost. As for family coverage, employees in both Iowa and national organizations identically pay 30 percent of the total family cost.Single Health Deductibles

KFF’s report shows that, on a national basis, the average single deductible is $1,655, which is $537 lower than the Iowa average of $2,192. Part of this difference may be explained in the composition of small employers participating in each survey. As we know from previous results, smaller employers are less likely to control their health costs when compared to larger, more sophisticated employers – employers that have more tools at their disposal to keep their rates down (e.g. administration costs, self-insuring, etc).

Perhaps a larger mix of smaller employers in the Iowa study could very well influence the overall deductible averages being higher – however, this is pure speculation. NOTE: Family deductibles were excluded in this comparison due to insufficient historical data from KFF.

The following graphic displays how Iowa single deductibles compare to national norms.Conclusion

In past years, the KFF results most always demonstrated higher national health premiums compared to Iowa. However, despite higher premiums, employees in the U.S. paid, on average, a similar percentage for their health premiums than Iowans, except for family coverage, where they paid a lower percentage compared to Iowans. In 2019, however, Iowans have ‘regressed to the mean’ and now appear to be paying a similar percentage of the premium for both single and family coverages.

Despite having lower premiums, Iowa workers are asked to pay higher deductibles compared to their national counterparts, which makes paying for medical services a bit more challenging each year. Tracking these key components are vital to learning how Iowans fare with the rest of the country, and it appears that Iowa is becoming ‘more the norm’ in some of these components.

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