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Voices on Hospitals: Transparency in Medical Outcomes

Time To ImproveIn my mind, the Holy Grail of healthcare is having information on each provider’s medical outcomes – in other words, having transparent outcomes.

How many of us desire to use a doctor or hospital who demonstrates marginal or poor outcomes? No one, I’m quite sure. Yet we have little, if any, verified qualitative information that consistently benchmarks one provider with another provider for the same medical procedure within any geographical area. This is actually a great gig for those medical providers who underperform the services they are handsomely paid to deliver to patients.

Needless to say, this MUST change — and it cannot happen soon enough.

In healthcare, we know that recommended care is delivered about 55 percent of the time, yet our costs continue to rise despite the poor outcomes delivered. Why does this happen? Because the medical ‘establishment’ is much louder (and active) in Washington D.C. than the majority of us who innocently assume that others have our best interest in mind.

Since a majority of healthcare providers fail to track outcomes or cost by medical condition, it’s imperative that a systematic measurement process is established to improve healthcare outcomes. During those times when measurement does occur, they’re typically easier process measurements that determine levels of compliance with practice guidelines. Unfortunately, these measurements may not adequately address the quality metrics needed to advance “value” in healthcare. Performing these measurements serve nothing more than a mirage of what we REALLY desire to have – improved medical outcomes.

Indicator #10: Transparency in Medical Outcomes

The jig is up. Iowa employers have sounded off about how they view hospitals regarding transparency in medical outcomes. Statewide, Iowa hospitals received an anemic score of 6.1, or a grade of ‘C-minus’ for their efforts on being transparent with their outcomes. When segmented into five regions using size-weighted scores, four regions ‘fail’ while only the northwest region received a ‘high-D’ grade.

Polk County hospitals, graded by 144 employers, received a score of 4.3 (failing), while Johnson County (home of Iowa City) received a 5.8 score, or ‘high-D’ grade. A few other notable counties with large populations include Linn County (5.6) and Dubuque County (4.8), grades of ‘D’ and ‘F’ respectively.

Regional - Transparency in Medical Outcomes Map-Master

According to Michael E. Porter and Thomas H. Lee, M.D. of Harvard, “The only true measures of quality are the outcomes that matter to patients. And when those outcomes are collected and reported publicly, providers face tremendous pressure – and strong incentives – to improve and to adopt best practices, with resulting improvements in outcomes.”

Iowa employers have found their voice, now it is time to raise it to unprecedented decibels.

In next week’s blog, we’ll review how Iowa employers graded hospitals on our final two performance indicators: ‘Cost Transparency’ and ‘Keeping Cost Reasonable.’

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