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Was Grandma Ahead of Her Time?

It’s early Friday morning, a day that marks the beginning of a long holiday weekend, which will culminate on Monday – Christmas Day. In my office, I’ve just poured my third cup of java and started perusing newly-arrived emails from last night and this morning. One particular email caught my eye and I naturally opened it to learn more.

The content was about…coffee.

Grandma and Coffee

The aroma and taste of coffee, at least for me, became an acquired and ‘necessary’ habit over the years, beginning while I was in college. Late night cramming required that I not doze during the precious remaining critical hours prior to the exams. Caffeinated coffee became my best late-night friend.

The origin of my eventual coffee ‘addiction’ can be traced back to my grandparent’s farm – an acreage north of Detroit Lakes, MN. During the summer months in the late 1960s, my siblings and I would have the opportunity to spend time at the farm helping with chores and experience rural living – working in the garden, hitching a ride on a tractor, playing by the slough, and enjoying some of the best home-grown beef and vegetables at dinner. Without a doubt, the time spent on the farm provided some of my best childhood memories!

To begin their day, I noticed that my grandparents enjoyed a hot beverage that was prepared on their wood-burning stove. While percolating, the aroma of the black brew seemed somewhat odd to me, but my grandparents relished the benefits coffee provided to them when beginning their day. As an impressionable boy, I remember asking Grandma if I could have a sip of this ‘black magic,’ and she, very prudently, complied. I remember her telling me, “Someday, you may like the taste of this, David!” The taste, I quickly learned, was not what I had expected, and that was my first and last sip of coffee – until my college days.

Recent Findings about Coffee

The email I received about coffee came from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. According to a study recently published by Harvard, people with colorectal cancer (CRC) who drank at least four cups of coffee per day after their diagnosis had a ‘significantly lower’ risk of early death – either from this cancer or any cause – than those who didn’t drink coffee. According to the American Cancer Society, CRC is the second-leading cause of cancer in the U.S.

Just four days earlier, I had successfully completed my fourth colonoscopy since 2003. Needless to say, I instinctively poured myself another cup of java and continued reading.

Previous evidence suggested that coffee may help lower the risk of mortality, in addition to several chronic diseases, possibly due to its ability to fight inflammation and insulin resistance. Coffee contains anti-carcinogenic compounds that can benefit us in other ways. Although this newest finding cannot claim causality between drinking coffee and reduced mortality risk, the findings are nevertheless encouraging and are worth further exploration.

My grandparents have long since passed away, but what they shared with their grandson some 50 years ago continues to add to the priceless memories I have of them today. Without realizing it, perhaps grandma was ahead of her time regarding coffee’s taste and health benefits!

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